CHRISTOPHER GIST'S JOURNALS

WITH HISTORICAL, GEOGRAPHICAL AND ETHNOLOGICAL NOTES AND BIOGRAPHIES OF HIS CONTEMPORARIES

BY

WILLIAM M. DARLINGTON [1815-1889]
PITTSBURGH, J. R. WELDIN & CO.,
1893. [Part 5.]

1751 December 9.óRiver Monongahela, said to be from the Shawnee Mehmonauangehelak. Falling-in-Bank River. (See note to "Washington's Tour to the Ohio," p. 244.) "The Cavity in a Rock" was probably on the river bank, on the east side, six miles from Brownsville, up the river, on the farm now owned by Captain Jacobs; in the original patent it is called the Cave Tract, "Menangihilli;" this word implies "high banks breaking off in some places and tumbling down." (John Heckwelder, "American Philosophical Society," Vol. IV, new series, 1834, p. 376.) The correctness of these definitions is doubtful, the banks of this river do not "fall in" or "break off" more than those of the Ohio, Allegheny, and many other streams, nor is it known that they ever did, and the Indians invariably gave accurate descriptive names. It may be, however, that the banks at some point on the river "fell in" on some occasion, to commemorate which, the Indians applied the name. (The name Monongahela first appears on the map of William Mayo, in 1737, and next on the map of Fry and Jefferson, 1751.)